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International Award for Sutherland Shire’s Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway

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Sutherland Shire Council is pleased to announce the Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway Stage 6 Project has won an international award in the 2019 International Project Management Association Awards in Mexico.

The Gold Medal for the Global Project Excellence Award in the category of small/medium sized projects for Social/ Regional Development/ Community Service is the project’s fifth industry award.

Nominated by the Australian Institute of Project Management, the Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway Project has been an incredible success since the final section of ‘Stage 6’, connecting Shorebird Reserve and Atkinson Road Taren Point, was opened in April 2018.

“We are exceptionally proud to have received another industry award for this important project, this time on the international stage,” said Sutherland Shire Mayor, Councillor Carmelo Pesce.

“The design and project management components of our multi-award winning Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway project were undertaken in house, so receiving awards like this is testament to the hard work and dedication of those involved and also reflects the impressive quality of facilities Council is delivering for our community.”

Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Project Management, Elizabeth Foley said they chose only the highest calibre projects in Australia to represent project management on the international stage at the 2019 IPMA Global Awards.

“Sutherland Shire Council’s Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway at Taren Point was an entry from the 2018 Project Management Achievement Awards program that we identified as delivering project excellence whilst simultaneously benefiting the community by delivering a project of historical and environmental significance,” Ms Foley said.

The five kilometre Woolooware Bay Shared Pathway is a major part of the 43.6 kilometre long Botany Bay Trail that will enable the community to safely walk and cycle along a dedicated shared pathway around Botany Bay from La Perouse to Kurnell.

It also provides an important regional link to the Greater Sydney region, including Kingsford Smith Airport, Sydney CBD, Homebush and Ryde.

Whilst being a safe, accessible transport link and recreational space for Sutherland Shire residents, their families and visitors, the foreshore is also habitat for a community of shorebirds, both migratory and resident, of which one is critically endangered, three are endangered and ten are vulnerable.

The dilapidated heritage listed oyster processing jetty was sensitively restored and a new sand island constructed to provide a place for roosting and nesting for shorebirds. The sand island has already been used by shorebirds including the endangered pied oystercatcher and the bar-tailed godwit, who make an annual migration as far as the Arctic Circle.

Environmentally friendly seawalls also provide protection to the foreshore from erosion and have been planted with 990 square metres of threatened native salt marsh species.

Source: Sutherland Shire Council

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